Tate Britain ☆☆

The 1500s/1600s gallery in the Tate Britain Museum, Tate Britain, London (Photo by Stu Smith)
The 1500s/1600s gallery in the Tate Britain Museum
The 1500s/1600s gallery in the Tate Britain Museum, Tate Britain, London (Photo by Stu Smith)
The neoclassical facade of the Tate Britain, designed by Sidney R. J. Smith, Tate Britain, London (Photo by Tony Hisgett)
The Shipwreck (1805) by JMW Turner, Tate Britain, London (Photo )
The Girlhood of Mary Virgin (1848–9) by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Ophelia (1851–2) by Sir John Everett Millais, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
St Benedetto, Looking towards Fusina (1843) by JMW Turner, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Proserpine (1874) by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Nocturne: Blue and Silver - Chelsea (1871) by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Ena and Betty, Daughters of Asher and Mrs Wertheimer (1901) by John Singer Sargent, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Maquette for Family Group (1943) by Henry Moore, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Branch Hill Pond, Hampstead Heath, with a Cart and Carters (c.1825) by John Constable, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
My Parents (1977) by David Hockney, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Norham Castle, Sunrise (c.1845) by JMW Turner, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Giovanna Baccelli (1782) Thomas Gainsborough, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Titania and Puck with Fairies Dancing (c.1786) by William Blake Oberon, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Lord Howard de Walden (c.1905–6) by Auguste Rodin, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Sketch for ‘Hadleigh Castle’ (c.1828–9) by John Constable, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
The Painter and his Pug (Self-portrait) (1745) by William Hogarth, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Three Ladies Adorning a Term of Hymen (1773) by Joshua Reynolds, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
The Kiss (1916) by Sir Hamo Thornycroft, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
The Cholmondeley Ladies (c.1600–10) by the 17th century British School, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Symphony in White, No. 2: The Little White Girl (1864) by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Reclining Figure (1951) by Henry Moore, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)
Carnation, Lily, Lily, Rose (c.1885) by John Singer Sargent, Tate Britain, London (Photo courtesy of the Tate)

A gallery of some of the greatest hits of British painting and sculpture

The Tate Britain houses the national collections of British art made from the 15th century to the early 20th century.

This means room after room filled with paintings by Gainsborough, Reynolds, Stubbs, Blake, Constable, and especially Hogarth and Joseph Mallord William Turner.

There is also a lovely colleciton of Pre-Raphaelite works, and a good colleciton of Henry Moore sculptures.

Since the gallery’s modern art collection decamped to Bankside (the Tate Modern), the British collection has expanded to fill the entirety of the museum’s traditional seat in a neoclassical building on Millbank.

 
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Tips

How long should I spend at the Tate Britain?

Unless you’re really into British art, only expect to spend about 30 minutes here—though you might do it at lunchtime, as the Tate has an excellent cafe.

Add another 20 minutes for the long walk to and from the nearest Tube station.

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